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Issues

Our Back Pages:
Issue #75, March 1986

Issue #75The beautiful cover photograph by noted poet Patricia Young is titled "Cousins," and while it probably would ruffle feathers if published these days it nevertheless captures an innocence and wonder that can’t help but bring a smile. The inside pages of this issue will do the same, with a rich variety of voices. Read more.

Following the success of our 50 Issues Project, in which we highlighted select back issues in honour of the University of Victoria’s 50th anniversary, we decided to cast our gaze back, chronologically, over our complete backlist…to include (eventually!) brief reviews of every issue not previously covered. Featured issues will be highlighted on our website biweekly.

Continue reading about this week's featured issue (write-up by Rhonda Batchelor).


News

2016 Open Season Awards Shortlist Announced

Long Poem PrizeWe're pleased to announce the shortlist for the 2016 Open Season Awards! Finalists have been chosen in all categories: poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction.

Thanks to all supporters and entrants for making this possible. The grand prize winners will be announced by February 5 online and through social media. $4,500 in prize money to be won.

Open Season Awards shortlist available here.


Issues

Our Back Pages:
Issue #74, March 1986

Issue #74The 1986 Issue 74 opens with a contemporary 2015 topic – transgenderism. “Christina/Philippe” is a two hander by Per Brask, who trained as a Dramaturg in Denmark before immigrating to Canada. The play explores the conversations that might have taken place had two historical figures been able to meet and discuss their sexual identities. Read more.

Following the success of our 50 Issues Project, in which we highlighted select back issues in honour of the University of Victoria’s 50th anniversary, we decided to cast our gaze back, chronologically, over our complete backlist…to include (eventually!) brief reviews of every issue not previously covered. Featured issues will be highlighted on our website biweekly.

Continue reading about this week's featured issue (write-up by Maureen Magee ).


Reviews

Spotlight CNF Issue Review - This Place a Stranger: Canadian Women Travelling Alone

This Place a Stranger

The Malahat's first-ever Creative Nonfiction Issue is hot off the press, and we're celebrating with a spotlight review of This Place a Stranger, edited by Vici Johnstone. Publisher Caitlin Press calls it a "sometimes tragic, sometimes uproariously funny" collection of travelogues from Canadian women. And here's a snapshot of what Malahat book reviewer Kirsten Fogg said about the collection:

I’ve travelled on my own many times and the clear prose of This Place a Stranger: Canadian Women Travelling Alone would have been a welcome companion. In the past, I’ve started books about adventuring women only to put them down, disappointed because the focus was on the external rather than the more interesting and complex internal journey. Yvonne Blomer, Shannon Webb-Campbell, and the other authors of the twenty-three essays in this collection, have layered and woven the personal with the public, and candid honesty with pertinent details so we get a real sense of who the writer is in that particular place.

Read more about This Place a Stranger.


Publishing Tips

Tips on Attention

Publishing TipsDon't think you have the time to write? Ottawa writer and blogger rob mclennan dishes up hearty advice on snapping out of the writers' block mentality and strengthening your time-management regime.

Attention is a muscle, one that requires development. I know writers that require a soundless space and enforced solitude; I acknowledge that for some this is the only way to proceed, but it all seems a bit precious, akin to suggesting that one can’t do any work until life is perfect and calm (which never happens, as you know). Silence and attention are not mutually exclusive. So you want to write?

Read the rest of rob's publishing tip on unleashing your writing potential.


Issues

Our Back Pages:
Issue #71, June 1985

Issue #71Malahat’s summer 1985 issue is a rich picnic basket of reading materials filled with literary forms and styles to suit the tastes of any reader—perfect for taking to the beach. As an appetizer, there are eight poems about angels by Gail Harris that complement the cover photograph (by David Tasker) of a divine cemetery statue. Read more.

Following the success of our 50 Issues Project, in which we highlighted select back issues in honour of the University of Victoria’s 50th anniversary, we decided to cast our gaze back, chronologically, over our complete backlist…to include (eventually!) brief reviews of every issue not previously covered. Featured issues will be highlighted on our website biweekly.

Continue reading about this week's featured issue (write-up by Jay Ruzesky).


E-Newsletter

Malahat lite: January 2016 Edition

Josh ZapfHappy New Year! The first e-newsletter of 2016 is short and sweet, packed with details about the upcoming Novella Prize deadline and Creative Nonfiction Issue.

Novella Prize: deadline is fast approaching (February 1)! Send in a king-sized fiction story between 10- and 20,000 words to be eligible for the $1500 prize.

Content Interviews: Elusive Boundaries: Mapping CNF in Canada is set for print and mail later this month, and we're stocking our website with interviews by lucky contributors. This month, J.D. Zapf talks about blending fiction and nonfiction in his piece, "Median Love," and the interconnectivity of modern love in today's world.

Publishing Tip: Canadian writer and blogger rob mclennan dishes up hearty advice on snapping out of the writers' block mentality and strengthening your time-management regime.

Discover all this and more in the January edition of Malahat lite.


Issues

Our Back Pages:
Issue #70, March 1985

Issue #70The 70th issue of the Malahat  is dedicated to John Metcalf (1938-  ), introduced by Constance Rooke as a stylist and a polemicist, a writer of “all three fictional sizes—the story, the novella, and the novel,” as well as an essayist, editor, and anthologist. She raves about his humour, his precision, and his skill. Rooke’s editorial comment is followed by an equally complimentary introduction from Alice Munro (1931-  ), queen of the short story and recipient of multiple awards, including the Nobel Prize in Literature. Needless to say, her praise of a fellow writer is not to be taken lightly. Read more.

Following the success of our 50 Issues Project, in which we highlighted select back issues in honour of the University of Victoria’s 50th anniversary, we decided to cast our gaze back, chronologically, over our complete backlist…to include (eventually!) brief reviews of every issue not previously covered. Featured issues will be highlighted on our website biweekly.

Continue reading about this week's featured issue (write-up by John Barton).


Interviews

Interview with Alicia Elliott, Nonfiction Contributor to Issue #193, Winter 2015

Alicia ElliottMalahat volunteer Katie Weaver talks teen pregnancy, parenthood, and identity with Tuscarora writer Alicia Elliott in her nonfiction piece, "Weight." Elliott's piece will be published in Issue #193, Mapping Creative Nonfiction in Canada, a special themed issue dedicated entirely to works of CNF. This issue will be mailed February 2016.

KW: You use second-person point of view throughout your memoir. How did you choose this POV to tell such a personal story? Was it how you’d always imagined the story to be told?

AE: This actually started as a much different first-person piece. I'd been writing it in bits and pieces for months but it wasn't really working. Then, as I was waiting for the bus to work one day, the first line of the piece came to me and everything clicked. It wasn't long after that I had my first draft. I think writing it in second-person gave me the distance necessary to really engage with the material without worrying too much about voice, which is something I'm very aware of when writing in first-person. The interesting thing about second-person, though, is when you read it, it doesn't distance you at all. It actually draws you in.

Read the full interview here.


E-Newsletter

Malahat lite: December 2015 Edition

Joan ThomasIt's the most wonderful time of the year... and with it comes the last Malahat lite e-newsletter until 2016!

Novella Prize: this year, we're swinging heavy with contest judges Mark Anthony Jarman, Stephen Marche, and Joan Thomas, all accomplished Canadian writers who will be choosing the single best Novella entry in 2016. Want to know what they're looking for in contest entries? Read on to find out!

Content Interviews: Elusive Boundaries: Mapping CNF in Canada, Issue #193, is the Malahat's first-ever nonfiction-themed issue. Close to 250 submissions were received and our editors had the painstaking task of whittling them down to under 20! Two contributors, Maria Tessa Liem (who won this year's CNF 2015 Contest) and Alicia Elliott, each talk about their respective pieces in Malahat lite.

Subscriptions: take advantage of our holiday discount for Malahat subscriptions: just $15 for a full year's worth of issues. Regular subscriptions cost between $35 and $45, so put The Malahat Review on everyone's wish list (including your own) and nestle in this holiday season with some exceptional Canadian and international writing.

Discover all this and more in the December edition of Malahat lite.


Issues

Our Back Pages:
Issue #69, October 1984

Issue #69If you’re interested in reading authors you admire at earlier stages of their careers, this issue provides you with ample opportunity. It opens with Carol Shields’ “Love So Fleeting: Love So Fine.” With two novels thus far to her credit, the author of The Stone Diaries (winner of a Governor General’s Award and a Pulitzer Prize in 1993) follows a husband of thirty around Winnipeg who, after noticing a sign in an orthopedic shoe store’s window that announces “Wendy Is Back!” continues walking while daydreaming about who Wendy is. He falls in love with “his Wendy,” then drifts on to reminisce about other chanced-upon,  “invented” women on whom he’s lavished “love” with like gusto. Read more.

Following the success of our 50 Issues Project, in which we highlighted select back issues in honour of the University of Victoria’s 50th anniversary, we decided to cast our gaze back, chronologically, over our complete backlist…to include (eventually!) brief reviews of every issue not previously covered. Featured issues will be highlighted on our website biweekly.

Continue reading about this week's featured issue (write-up by John Barton).


Subscribe

Holiday Subscription Offer: One Year For $15

Xmas campaign

December's here, and with it comes holiday break, snow (if you're lucky), hearty treats... and magazine discounts!

Until January 31, 2016, enjoy our biggest discount of the year with $15 holiday subscriptions. Regular subscriptions cost between $35 and $45 depending on where you live, so take advantage of this cheap offer for yourself or a friend. Warm up near the fire, sip some hot toddys, and nestle in with great reads from some of Canada's (and the world's) finest poets, short-story writers, memorists and book reviewers. This offer stands for both new and current subscribers.

Click here to purchase a $15 one-year subscription.


Contests

Novella Prize Now Open for Submissions

Novella PrizeThe Malahat's biennial Novella Prize welcomes submissions of prose between 10,000 and 20,000 words. This contest only runs every other year, so don't delay in pulling out pen and paper (or keyboard and mouse).

All submissions cost $35 in Canada, $40 in the U.S., and $45 elsewhere. Additional novella submissions cost $15 each from anywhere, no limit. Since we know you love reading The Malahat Review, we offer a year's worth of subscription for the first novella entry payment!

Deadline is February 1, 2016. This year's contest judges are Mark Anthony Jarman, Stephen Marche, and Joan Thomas.

Get full details on sending in your work for the 2016 Novella Prize.


Reviews

Spotlight Fiction Review: Boy Lost in Wild by Brenda Hasiuk

Boy Lost in Wild

Looking for a new book to snatch up this holiday season? Our current Fall issue might have just the thing. Book reviewer Susan Sanford Blades lets us in on why Hasiuk's Boy Lost in Wild should be on your wish list:

In her third book of fiction but first book of short stories, Boy Lost in Wild, Brenda Hasiuk offers eight Winnipeg stories that ambitiously capture aspects of the city. Hasiuk embodies a unique voice in every story and it is clear she has done her research, both in terms of character psychology and in representing a wide array of Winnipeg’s inhabitants, from a young First Nations boy giving a speech as poster boy for a local youth shelter, to a Chinese exchange student tormented by a screaming neighbour, an inattentive landlord and some local punks, to a family of Indian immigrants dealing with the regrets of their lovelorn father and their track-star son’s possible cancerous tumour—even including characters from the city’s abnormally large Icelandic population.

Read the rest of this book review.


Interviews

Interview with Dan Siney, Cover Art Photographer for Issue 192

Dan SineyFiction board member Lee Henderson and Vancouver-area photographer Dan Siney chat about Dan's inspiration for "Stump 2," a stump-skull photo taken on Gambier Island and selected as the featured cover art for the Malahat's Autumn 2015 issue.

LH: You've made a series of photographs of the stumps from old logging. Can you talk about the process for making these pictures?

DS: I was helping my friend Gretchen clear hiking paths for the Gambier Island Conservancy. She lived on Gambier at the time and she had an annoying goat. She made saddle bags for the goat to carry some of our gear. It was winter, and the three of us would hike two to three days into the forest and back again. Deep in the woods the old growth stumps, of which there was maybe one for every 20 trees, looked like the ghosts of the “original” forest to me. You could look up and around and imagine the space filled with these massive trees in place of the existing ones.

Read the full interview here.


Issues

Our Back Pages:
Issue #68, July 1983

Issue #68In a somewhat disheartening beginning to the issue, editor Constance Rooke’s comment informs readers that the Malahat has fallen into hard times. Due to a “substantial reduction in the University of Victoria’s contribution to the budget”, the Malahat had to rely on financial assistance from the provincial government in order to publish its 68th issue. Despite this challenge, the hard-working editorial team managed to produce an excellent volume. The cover photo of a Mexican woman is an indication of the theme behind the issue’s two main components: David Lampson’s “photo essay” and Mexican-inspired stories by Patrick Roscoe’s (1961- ). Read more.

Following the success of our 50 Issues Project, in which we highlighted select back issues in honour of the University of Victoria’s 50th anniversary, we decided to cast our gaze back, chronologically, over our complete backlist…to include (eventually!) brief reviews of every issue not previously covered. Featured issues will be highlighted on our website biweekly.

Continue reading about this week's featured issue (write-up by Chloe Hogan-Weihmann).


News

Former Malahat Contributor Deirdre Dore Wins 2015 Writers' Trust Journey Prize

Deirdre DoreThe Malahat Review is pleased to congratulate Deirdre Dore on winning this year's $10,000 Journey Prize for her story, "The Wise Baby," originally published in Geist magazine.

Dore is a previous contributor to the Malahat, with her story "Sappers Bridge" published in Issue #173, Winter 2010. This story went on to win Gold in Fiction at the Western Magazine Awards! A description of Dore's WMA win, and an excerpt from "Sappers Bridge" can both be read here.

Read the full JP announcement on the Writers' Trust website.


Interviews

Interview with Joshua James Edgar, Fiction Contributor to Issue #192, Autumn 2015

Joshua EdgarFiction board intern Kelsey Lauder talks with Joshua James Edgar about the perceptions of hockey in Canadian culture and bringing justice to silenced female voices in "Jane Doe," Joshua's short story as it appears in Issue #192, Autumn 2015 of the Malahat.

KL: Situations similar to the case that occurs in “Jane Doe” continuously show up in the news these days, often with the same one-sided show of support from the community. What made you want to write a fictionalized version of these events?

JJE: I was in the last months of a journalism degree when the Steubenville verdict was announced. What followed was a barrage of American news coverage that emphasized the perpetrators’ sullied football dreams instead of the horrible crimes they’d been charged with, and while it was demoralizing to see this side of an industry I was hoping to graduate into, I also felt like so many vital conversations were coming out of both the verdict and its reportage. Most of the people in my life at the time were talking about how problematic it was that Americans worship their athletes from such a young age. But the thing was, I grew up in a hockey town, and I’d seen too many teenage hockey stars do awful things and get away them to believe that this brand of athlete worship was an “American problem.”

Read the full interview here.


Issues

Our Back Pages:
Issue #66, July 1983

Issue #66The eclecticism of Constance Rooke’s second issue as editor maps a transition in focus. Alongside the European writers in translation and the critical articles that Robin Skelton had no doubt recruited before he stepped down, readers encountered six poems by Patricia Young and a short story by Terry Griggs. Michael Ondaatje also appears as a triple threat with a poem called “Red Accordion,” a photograph inside of Christopher Dewdney, and an untitled cover photograph. Read more.

Following the success of our 50 Issues Project, in which we highlighted select back issues in honour of the University of Victoria’s 50th anniversary, we decided to cast our gaze back, chronologically, over our complete backlist…to include (eventually!) brief reviews of every issue not previously covered. Featured issues will be highlighted on our website biweekly.

Continue reading about this week's featured issue (write-up by John Barton).


Publishing Tips

Finding the Right Publisher For You

Publishing TipsNovember's Publishing Tip comes to you from Kari Jones, an instructor in the Department of English at Camosun College. In addition to teaching, Kari writes books for kids, including Out of Season, which has been translated into five languages. Her most recent kid’s story is So Much for Democracy.

Self-publishing is becoming more accessible and acceptable to serious writers, but there are still a lot of us who prefer to work with traditional publishing houses. However, the vast and quickly changing world of traditional publishing can be daunting to enter into.

Read the rest of Kari's advice on finding the right publisher.


E-Newsletter

Malahat lite: November 2015 Edition

Dan SineyThis month's e-newsletter highlights content from the latest Malahat issue, Fall #192, and offers up web goodies for all our readers!

Contributor interviews: Joshua James Edgar delves into his fiction story, "Jane Doe," a vivid snapshot on a crime committed by hockey players and the people who continue to support them. And Dan Siney (pictured: photo credit goes to Jennilee Marigomen), photographer of the latest cover art, takes us on a moss-covered journey of his inspirations and passions.

Publishing Tip: this month, Kari Jones, Professor of English at Camosun College, shares ideas on how to best find the right publisher for your manuscript.

Contests: we're now accepting entries for the biennial Novella Prize! Submit an oeuvre grandiose between 10- and 20,000 words for your chance at $1500. This year's judges are Mark Anthony Jarman, Joan Thomas, and Stephen Marche.

Discover all this and more in the November edition of Malahat lite.


Issues

Issue 192, Fall 2015 Has Been Shipped

Issue 192

We hope you're eagerly awaiting the autumn issue, because it's here!

Check your mailboxes these next few weeks and you'll be pleasantly surprised. As the cover art by Dan Siney suggests, each new poem, short story and memoir is like a forest you'll want to lose yourself in. Contributors include Jan Conn, Dani Couture, Sina Queyras, matt robinson, Mallory Tater, Stephanie Warner, Thomas Wharton, Robert Horn, Alex Leslie, and many more.

See the full table of contents for more names, interviews and contributor websites.


Issues

Our Back Pages:
Issue #65, July 1983

Issue #65In July 1983 a song by the Police called "Every Breath You Take" was at the top of the charts, Martina Navratilova won the women's final at Wimbledon, Pierre Elliott Trudeau was our prime minister again, and one epoch in the life of The Malahat Review drew to a close while another began. Issue 65 is the first issue edited by Constance Rooke (1942 - 2008) who took over from Malahat co-founder, Robin Skelton (1925 - 1997). In her introductory comment, Rooke announces her intention to make Malahat "more distinctly a Canadian literary magazine." So with issue 65, the subtitle, 'An International Magazine of Life and Letters' was removed from the masthead. Read more.

Following the success of our 50 Issues Project, in which we highlighted select back issues in honour of the University of Victoria’s 50th anniversary, we decided to cast our gaze back, chronologically, over our complete backlist…to include (eventually!) brief reviews of every issue not previously covered. Featured issues will be highlighted on our website biweekly.

Continue reading about this week's featured issue (write-up by Jay Ruzesky).


Interviews

Interview with Russell Thornton, Poetry Judge for the 2015 Open Season Awards

Russell ThorntonMalahat volunteer stephen e. leckie talks with Open Season Award poetry judge Russell Thornton about great poems as the meeting place between language and experience. Russell Thornton's most recent book, The Hundred Lives, was shortlisted for the 2015 Griffin Poetry Prize.

SL: Do you have any thoughts on literary contests in Canada? Are they essential for new, as well as established writers to engage in the production of contemporary literature?

RT: I think most writers experience the impulse to get their efforts out into the agora—to engage in that sort of contest. On a basic level, of course, it's a similar situation when you build a table or chair; you're probably going to end up at least a little curious to see if anyone values the quality enough to want to sit at or in the thing for more than half a minute. And there's a simple and very real pleasure in seeing a poem of yours between covers and on nice paper (or on a nicely designed webpage) and in an elegant font with "winner" or "honourable mention" above it and among other people's poems that you think are good.

Read the full interview here.


Subscribe

Student Offer for $11.95 until November

Back to School

In the midst of midterms and memorizing madness, don't forget to purchase a one-year subscription at our most discounted rate yet!

Students at high schools, colleges and universities can take advantage of this offer and get four issues for the price of one. Feeling generous? Buy three subscriptions or more for fellow students, and you'll receive your own subscription for free!

See the student subscription page for details on ordering.


News

Maria Tessa Liem Wins Malahat's 2015 Constance Rooke Creative Nonfiction Prize

Maria Tessa LiemThe Malahat Review is pleased to announce the winner of its 2015 Constance Rooke Creative Nonfiction Prize!

Maria Tessa Liem has won this year's CNF Contest with her piece, "Rice Cracker," chosen from over 180 submissions. The piece will be published in Issue 193, Winter 2015, a special themed issue dedicated entirely to works of creative nonfiction.

Thanks to contest judge Jane Silcott for selecting the best memoir, and to all the entrants who sent in amazing works of nonfiction!

Read what Jane Silcott had to say about "Rice Cracker."


Issues

Our Back Pages:
Issue #64, February 1983

Issue #64Number 64 is the final issue of The Malahat Review to appear under the stewardship of Robin Skelton (1925-1997). One cannot help but feel that this issue holds special meaning for him, thus, making it a must-have for readers’ own collections. In this bountiful edition, Skelton becomes a subject in Peter Milroy’s photographic series “A Portfolio of Writers.” No fewer than thirteen provocative black-and-white portraits grace the pages, including the cover shot of Kathleen Raine (1908-2004). Other subjects include Elaine Feinstein, Leon Rooke, and Elizabeth Jennings (1926-2001). Lovers of poetry will delight in works from Canada, Great Britain, USA, Australia, Austria, and Poland. Local fare comes by way of renowned poets Lorna Uher (Crozier), recipient of countless awards including the Governor General’s Award (1992), and Linda Rogers, Poet Laureate of Victoria (2008-2011) and recipient of the Stephen Leacock Prize for Poetry (1994). Read more.

Following the success of our 50 Issues Project, in which we highlighted select back issues in honour of the University of Victoria’s 50th anniversary, we decided to cast our gaze back, chronologically, over our complete backlist…to include (eventually!) brief reviews of every issue not previously covered. Featured issues will be highlighted on our website biweekly.

Continue reading about this week's featured issue (write-up by Robin Reniero).


News

2015 CNF Contest Shortlist Announced

CNF posterWe're pleased to announce the shortlist for the 2015 Constance Rooke Creative Nonfiction Prize! Six finalists have been chosen.

Thanks to all supporters and entrants for making this possible. The grand prize winner will be announced by October 16 online and through social media.

Constance Rooke CNF Prize shortlist available here.


Interviews

Interview with Joe Rosenblatt, Poetry Contributor to the 2015 Autumn Issue

Joe RosenblattThis summer, poet Joe Rosenblatt blindfolded Malahat poetry board member Jay Ruzesky and led him into the woods to a secret location to sit on a windfall log, drink herb tea, and talk about the mysteries of the Green Man that are revealed in Rosenblatt’s poems in Issue #192, Autumn 2015.

Jay: When and how did you get interested in the Green Man? Was there a particular building or sculpture that inspired you?

Joe: I spent quite a number of hours sketching trees in the Qualicum Beach Heritage Forest, a nature preserve of forty acres not far from my house. I took hundreds of notations as well as doing sketches of the giant cedar stands—some that are first growth, others second growth, and then it occurred to me that there is a mythic protector of the forest, the ultimate forest manager—the Green Man.

Read the full interview here.


E-Newsletter

Malahat lite: October 2015 Edition

Issue 192The autumn issue of The Malahat Review is in the printing stages, and to celebrate its content, we have special e-newsletter goodies for all our readers.

Contributor interviews: two contributors to the upcoming autumn issue speak about their work. Joe Rosenblatt, whose poems inspired the sylvan cover art (pictured), talks about his encounter with the Green Man. And Alex Leslie intrigues us with tales of Yiddish folklore and history.

Contests: the Open Season Awards deadline is fast approaching (November 1) and we have big prize money to be awarded to three separate winners. Poetry, fiction and creative nonfiction categories will each give $1,500 (over $1,000 in previous years) and publication. Read interviews with contest judges Russell Thornton, Kathy Page, and Fiona Tinwei Lam and get inspired to enter.

Student subscription offer: high school, college and university students are encouraged to take advantage of our best deal yet. $11.95 for a year's worth of Malahat—that's the price of a single issue!

Discover all this and more in the October edition of Malahat lite.


Issues

Our Back Pages:
Issue #62, Spring 1982

Issue #62The issue begins with Scottish poet Ruthven Todd’s (1914-1978) memoirs. Todd paints a picture of an earnest young man trying to break onto a lively literary scene in the 1930s. His sense of humour and humility shine through as he gently pokes fun at his early poetry and describes his experiences rubbing shoulders with the likes of Salvador Dali, W. H. Auden, and Dylan Thomas, to mention only a few! Todd’s stories are sure to fascinate both literati and casual readers. Read more.

Following the success of our 50 Issues Project, in which we highlighted select back issues in honour of the University of Victoria’s 50th anniversary, we decided to cast our gaze back, chronologically, over our complete backlist…to include (eventually!) brief reviews of every issue not previously covered. Featured issues will be highlighted on our website biweekly.

Continue reading about this week's featured issue (write-up by Chloe Hogan-Weihmann).


Reviews

Issue 192, Autumn 2015 Book Reviews Online

Invasive Species

If you've been eagerly awaiting book reviews from our upcoming Fall issue, wait no longer! They're now available to read online. It's an exciting list of poetry, fiction and nonfiction books that you won't want to "leave" behind.

Reviews of poetry collections by Daniel Goodwin, Michael Pacey, Lynda Monahan, Deanna Young, Frances Boyle, and Raoul Fernandes; reviews of fiction by Meredith Quartermain, Brenda Hasiuk, and Mark Sampson; and reviews of nonfiction by Jeffery Donaldson.

Read the reviews from Issue #192's table of contents page.


Publishing Tips

Reviewing as Spiritual Practice: The Way of the Tithe

Publishing TipsSeptember's publishing tip comes to you from Canadian poet Shane Neilson, a previous Malahat contributor and reviewer. Here, he explains why all writers should dedicate at least ten percent of their creative energy to critiquing fellow writers' work.

I often receive requests by poets to review their work. They write me flattering emails, extolling my integrity as a tough critic. Then they move on to compromise that integrity by explaining why I should review their book. The really cheeky ones proposition me in person. Usually my assailant is a debut poet (and therefore hard to blame). No matter the stage of the writer making the request, the intrusion occurs often enough that I’ve developed a way of dealing with the nuisance.

Read the rest of Shane's commentary on writing book reviews.


Interviews

Interview with Kathy Page, Fiction Judge for the 2015 Open Season Awards

Kathy PageMalahat fiction contributor Trevor Corkum interviews Kathy Page, this year's fiction judge for the Open Season Awards, on personal literary influences and the future of Canada's short-story scene. Kathy Page’s latest collection of stories, Paradise & Elsewhere (reviewed on our site), was nominated for the 2014 Giller Prize, and was a finalist for the Ethel Wilson Prize.

TC: The short story form is chameleon and shape shifting, filled with infinite possibility. The best short fiction, I think, comes into being seemingly fully formed, completely original, sui generis. Who are the short story writers you admire most? What short fiction writers have had the biggest impact on your own work in this form?

KP: Yes—one of the wonderful things about the short story is the scope it offers for formal invention, how infinitely various and startlingly new (and at the same time ancient) it can be. Of course, the novel is a shape-shifter too, but brevity makes innovation and radical experiment more feasible, and it certainly makes it possible (though not required) to play around with the way plot is put to work. The short story, in its intensity and in the ways it is structured and read, is as much related to poetry as it is to the novel.

Read the full interview here.


Issues

Our Back Pages:
Issue #61, Winter 1982

Issue #61The Malahat Review’s 61st issue opens with Diane Keating’s poem “Qu’Appelle Valley,” which ties natural settings with human emotions and sets the tone for much of the poetry to follow. Some are meditative snapshots of subdued moments in nature, such as A.W. Elston’s “Five Poems in Search of Form” (his first publication) and William Virgil Davis’ “The Tree.” while others are more intense and darker in mood, such as Deirdre Ballantyne’s deeply evocative “Journey: a sequence” and Neile Graham’s two phenomenal pieces “Sky Dark, Cloudless and Starless” and “The Seasons Break Their Shapes.” Read more.

Following the success of our 50 Issues Project, in which we highlighted select back issues in honour of the University of Victoria’s 50th anniversary, we decided to cast our gaze back, chronologically, over our complete backlist…to include (eventually!) brief reviews of every issue not previously covered. Featured issues will be highlighted on our website biweekly.

Continue reading about this week's featured issue (write-up by Chloe Hogan-Weihmann).


Subscribe

Student Subscription Offer: $11.95 for 4 Issues

Back to School

For the first time ever, we're offering back-to-school subscriptions to students all over the world!

Interested in a year's worth of The Malahat Review? Don't let the tuition crunch dissuade you from subscribing. We've put together a special one-year subscription offer for students at just $11.95, our cheapest deal yet.

Feeling generous? If you purchase three subscriptions or more for fellow students, you receive your own subscription for free!

See the student subscription page for details on ordering.


News

UVic Students: Apply for Work / Study With Us

Work studyIf you're a UVic Student looking for part-time work this academic year, then you're in luck!

Eligible students can apply for one of two available positions: Editorial Assistant, or Marketing/Publicity Assistant. Both jobs average 4 hours per week with a range of duties. Students in English or Creative Writing programs are especially encouraged to apply.

Applicants must first get approval from UVic's Work/Study office before applying for these jobs. See the description page for more details.


E-Newsletter

Malahat lite: September 2015 Edition

Fiona LamBreeze into autumn with this month's e-newsletter: a cornucopia of news, interviews, and more!

Interviews: Open Season Award judges Russell Thornton (poetry), Kathy Page (fiction), and Fiona Tinwei Lam (creative nonfiction) discuss individual takes on their subject matter, and enlighten readers on how to best prepare their submission for a chance to win $1,500 each in this year's contest.

Far Horizons Award: Mark Rogers, this year's Far Horizons contest winner, talks about his winning short story "Heaven and Back Again, or The Goddit" and the trials and tribulations of putting words on paper.

Journey Prize: congratulations are underway for K'ari Fisher, who has been nominated for the $10,000 Writers' Trust Journey Prize with her short story, "Mercy Beatrice Wrestles the Noose."

Discover all this and more in the September edition of Malahat lite.


News

K'ari Fisher Nominated for 2015 Writers' Trust of Canada/McClelland & Stewart Journey Prize

Journey Prize logoThis just in: K'ari Fisher has been nominated for the Journey Prize with her Malahat short story, "Mercy Beatrice Wrestles the Noose"!

Each week, a new longlisted author will be announced on The Journey Prize facebook page. The collection of selected Journey Prize nominees' stories will be published in the 27th annual anthology, available October 8.

See the special announcement page here.


Issues

Our Back Pages:
Issue #60, Fall 1981

Issue #60In his editorial, Robin Skelton remembers John Glassco (1909–1981)—“among the finest writers of our time”—who’d died on January 29, 1981, two months before this issue was published. Skelton laments how the national press, when reporting the death of this significant Canadian author, largely focuses on his sometimes infamous erotic writings at the expense of his contributions as a translator, memoir (he is best known for Memoirs of Montparnasse, despite its inaccuracies, considered by many to be a finer evocation of the “Lost Generation” than Hemingway’s A Movable Feast) and poet (he won the Governor General’s Award in 1971 for a slim, 34-poems-long Selected Poems). Read more.

Following the success of our 50 Issues Project, in which we highlighted select back issues in honour of the University of Victoria’s 50th anniversary, we decided to cast our gaze back, chronologically, over our complete backlist…to include (eventually!) brief reviews of every issue not previously covered. Featured issues will be highlighted on our website biweekly.

Continue reading about this week's featured issue (write-up by Sheila Munro).


Interviews

Interview with John Goldbach, Fiction Contributor to the Malahat's Summer Issue

John GoldbachMalahat fiction board member and UVic Department of Writing professor Lee Henderson talks with Montreal novelist and short story author John Goldbach, using his story, “Sigismund Mohr: The Man Who Brought Electricity to Quebec,” which appears in Issue #191 (Summer 2015), as a launch pad for a more general discussion of writing historical fiction as well as John’s recommended reading.

LH: What about the subject, Sigismund Mohr, in particular, made you want to write this kind of fictionalized account of his life?

JG: Well, for starters, there’s so little information on Sigismund Mohr—he doesn’t even have a Wikipedia page, for instance—and he’s such a monumental figure, it seems to me, and fascinating; the subject of electricity and energy’s fascinating in its own right but this figure from Breslau arriving in Montreal and then transporting his family to Quebec City, where he’d one day bring hydroelectric power, harnessing waterpower from nearby Montmorency Falls, seems amazing to me, a man performing wizardry, and there’s virtually nothing on Mohr, which is strange and suspect, almost like the historical record’s been redacted, though that sounds paranoid and dramatic.

Read the full interview here.


Reviews

Poetry Book Reviews of Michael Prior's Swan Dive and Claire Kelly's Ur-Moth

Swan DiveFour times per year on its website, The Malahat Review posts reviews of books of poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction as they appear in each issue. Reviews are always highlighted online one month before issue publication to give readers a sample of what's new in the literary world.

In Issue 191, Summer 2015, Jay Ruzesky reviews Michael Prior's Swan Dive and Claire Kelly's Ur-Moth. Here's a sample of his review:

It seems almost quaint that a few years ago we literary writers were feeling threatened by electronic books. They were going to be the death of books and the end of poetry. But in short order it has become apparent that the electronic form is suited to distributing the books that used to be printed on cheap newsprint—the books that sell enough copies to make their authors money. So here we doff our toques to the venerable Canadian small presses that never wavered throughout that electronic kerfuffle; the publishers of short stories, novels, and collections of poems who always knew that readers like to hold good literature in their hands, not to resuscitate it, but to cradle it lovingly as one might hold a sleeping songbird. I mean, how many times can poetry die?

Continue reading here.


Contests

Submit Now To the Open Season Awards

Open Season ContestWith just two months to go, we hope you're busily preparing your entries for this year's Open Season contest! Join the ranks of past award-winners Tricia Dower, Erin Fisher, and Joelle Barron.

We've recently increased the total prize money to $4500 up from $3000!

For poetry entries, send up to three poems per entry with a maximum length for each of 100 lines. Fiction and creative nonfiction entries should be a maximum of 2500 words. The cost for your first entry is $35 in Canada, $40 in the U.S., and $45 elsewhere. Additional entries cost $15 each and there's no limit to how many you can send in; cross-genre entries are also accepted. Each entrant will receive a one-year subscription or renewal extension to The Malahat Review.

Deadline is November 1. This year's contest judges are Russell Thornton (poetry), Kathy Page (fiction), and Fiona Tinwei Lam (creative nonfiction).

Get full details on entering the 2016 Open Season Awards.


Issues

Our Back Pages:
Issue #58, Spring 1981

Issue #58In his editorial, Robin Skelton remembers John Glassco (1909–1981)—“among the finest writers of our time”—who’d died on January 29, 1981, two months before this issue was published. Skelton laments how the national press, when reporting the death of this significant Canadian author, largely focuses on his sometimes infamous erotic writings at the expense of his contributions as a translator, memoir (he is best known for Memoirs of Montparnasse, despite its inaccuracies, considered by many to be a finer evocation of the “Lost Generation” than Hemingway’s A Movable Feast) and poet (he won the Governor General’s Award in 1971 for a slim, 34-poems-long Selected Poems). Read more.

Following the success of our 50 Issues Project, in which we highlighted select back issues in honour of the University of Victoria’s 50th anniversary, we decided to cast our gaze back, chronologically, over our complete backlist…to include (eventually!) brief reviews of every issue not previously covered. Featured issues will be highlighted on our website biweekly.

Continue reading about this week's featured issue (write-up by John Barton).


Issues

Poetry Feature: Vincent Colistro's "Bus"

Vincent ColistroThe Malahat Review's Summer 2015 Issue was recently distributed to subscribers, and we're featuring a poem on our website from contributor Vincent Colistro!

Vincent's poetry has appeared in various literary magazines including The Walrus, Hazlitt, Grain and Geist. His first book of poetry is forthcoming with Signal Editions in 2016. This is Vincent's second appearance in The Malahat Review.

"I bought a bus pass from the Middle Eastern grocer on Fort Street
and some pomegranate extract and rosewater and Macedonian feta.

The grocer mentioned a cult of Jesus in Macedonia that only worshipped
His unopened side..."

Read the rest of this poem here.


Interviews

Interview with Sarah de Leeuw, Poetry Contributor to the Malahat's Summer Issue

Sarah de LeeuwMalahat poetry board member Samantha Ainsworth talks with Kelowna writer and professor Sarah de Leeuw about her poems, "Rogue Stars" and "Our temperate life," which appear in Issue #191 (Summer 2015). In this interview, de Leeuw sheds light on poetic craft, the power of extensive reading, and how place and space fit in to the writerly life.

SA: Your poetry rolls with lovely language and imagery, and draws its reader along to a point at which human connectivity occurs. In your poem, “Our Temperate Life” the speaker pulls “the blue grey exoskeleton from farmed/ Northern Striped Shrimp, my fingers cold/ under the tap’s thin running stream.” This sort of common experience bites at the senses and reminds us that we are similar beings that exist together on this earth. In the rendering down of complex issues in this concise manner, do you find that poetry reaches more people, is a more effective vehicle of communication than other genres?

SdL: It does seem to me that poetry encompasses such a huge range of expression; it’s hard to say one specific thing about it. On the one hand, I think poetry is something quite primal, something many people feel an affinity towardsI'm thinking here of greeting-card poetry or poetic quotes that offer many people daily affirmations. I’m also thinking of musical lyrics or powerful public speeches, both of which often deploy a kind of poetic convention. On the other hand, I think that poetry (shall we say Poetry with a Capital ‘P’?) has, for many people, a very alienating and elitist ring to it: how often have I heard “I just don’t understand poetry” or “poetry’s one thing I could NEVER write….”

Read the full interview here.


E-Newsletter

Malahat lite: August 2015 Edition

John GoldbachThis month's newsletter highlights Issue 191, our new summer issue recently delivered to mailboxes around the world!

Interviews: Sarah de Leeuw, poetry contributor to Issue 191, sheds light on the topography of her work with Malahat poetry board member Samantha Ainsworth; and John Goldbach, fiction contributor to 191, discusses historical fiction with board member Lee Henderson.

Long Poem Symposium: panel discussion papers by B.C. poets Kate Braid, Cornelia Hoogland, and Sharon Thesen are available to read on our website, as originally presented at The League of Canadian Poets' annual symposium.

Contests: our Constance Rooke CNF Prize has just ended, but we've opened the doors to the Open Season Awards (deadline November 1). Entrants have a chance at $1500 in poetry, fiction, or creative nonfiction categories.

Summer subscription deal: spend $15 on a one-year Malahat subscription! Best deal all year (normal subscriptions cost between $35 and $45).

Discover all this and more in the August edition of Malahat lite.


Issues

Our Back Pages:
Issue #57, Winter 1981

Issue #57A work by British artist and designer Sir Edward Burne-Jones (1833-1898) graces the cover of Issue 57 in Pre-Raphaelite splendour.  Indeed, it offers up a clue as to the contents of this edition. Burne-Jones was a member of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood, Aesthetic Movement, and the Arts and Crafts Movement. His compositions, rich in medieval and mythical imagery, were eventually overshadowed by unrelenting trends in modern art only to be rediscovered in the mid-1970s. Read more.

Following the success of our 50 Issues Project, in which we highlighted select back issues in honour of the University of Victoria’s 50th anniversary, we decided to cast our gaze back, chronologically, over our complete backlist…to include (eventually!) brief reviews of every issue not previously covered. Featured issues will be highlighted on our website biweekly.

Continue reading about this week's featured issue (write-up by Robin Reniero).


Contests

Creative Nonfiction Contest Deadline EXTENDED to August 4, 2015

CNF Contest iconSince August 1 falls on a Saturday, and August 3 is a statutory holiday in B.C., we've extended the deadline for this year's CNF contest to August 4. Take advantage of these extra days to polish up your contest memoirs!

The new submissions deadline is for both emailed and postmarked (snail mail) entries. The online payment option will be removed by midnight PST August 4.

Entries should be between 2000-3000 words and cost $35 in Canada, $40 in the U.S., and $45 elsewhere. Additional entries cost $15 each and there's no limit to how many you can send in. Each entrant will receive a one-year subscription or renewal extension to The Malahat Review.

Get full details on entering the 2015 Creative Nonfiction Contest.


Contests

Meet This Year's Open Season Contest Judges

Kathy PageThe Malahat Review has announced a stellar list of contest judges for this year's Open Season Awards!

While still three months away (deadline is November 1), we're happy to showcase the three distinct writers who will act as final contest judges. In poetry, Griffin Prize-nominated Russell Thornton takes the epic stage. In fiction, Kathy Page, longlisted for the Giller Prize, steps up to the short story plate. And in creative nonfiction, City of Vancouver Book Award finalist Fiona Tinwei Lam jumps head-on into the world of truth.

Exciting news: the contest prizes for each category have been increased to $1500!

Read biographies from each of the three contest judges.

Learn more details about submitting to this year's Open Season Awards.


Reviews

Creative Nonfiction Book Review of The House with the Parapet Wall by John Terpstra

The House with the Parapet WallFour times per year on its website, The Malahat Review posts reviews of books of poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction as they appear in each issue. Reviews are always highlighted online one month before issue publication to give readers a sample of what's new in the literary world.

In Issue 191, Summer 2015, Christin Geall reviews John Terpstra's nonfiction work, The House with the Papapet Wall. Here's a sample of her review:

"Do writers make the best readers? Or the most exacting? Reading Terpstra’s book, I wished I could have shut off my left brain to favour my right—to slow my analysis, absorb the work, and not dismantle the design of the book as a whole. But like the title suggests, The House with the Parapet Wall is about architecture and one can’t help notice its structure, how it is crafted of countless parts, parts that are constantly reframed and reprised."

Continue reading Christin Geall's book review of The House with the Parapet Wall.


Issues

Our Back Pages:
Issue #56, Fall 1980

Issue #56It can be said that issue number fifty-six is diverse enough to satisfy the palate of a reader from any generation. As is the case with all Malahats, this issue presents a pleasant mixture of poetry, artwork, and short stories. A particular poem that stands out is “For The Sea Turtles,” one of three by American poet Frannie Lindsay (1949-present). It is a brief poem that expresses the beauty of life’s journey and the cruelness of its end. Read More

Following the success of our 50 Issues Project, in which we highlighted select back issues in honour of the University of Victoria’s 50th anniversary, we decided to cast our gaze back, chronologically, over our complete backlist…to include (eventually!) brief reviews of every issue not previously covered. Featured issues will be highlighted on our website biweekly.

Continue reading about this week's featured issue (write-up by Elliot Hersant).


News

Congratulations to Mark Rogers, Winner of the 2015 Far Horizons Award for Fiction

Mark RogersThe Malahat Review is pleased to announce the winner of its 2015 Far Horizons Award!

Mark Rogers has won this year's Fiction award, which is given to emerging writers who have yet to publish works in book form. He receives a $1000 cash prize and his story, "Heaven and Back Again, or The Goddit," will be published in the Autumn 2015 issue of the Malahat.

Thanks to contest judge Elyse Friedman for choosing the winning story, and to all the entrants who sent in amazing works of fiction!

More details on the Far Horizons Award winner announcement page.


News

Long Poem Symposium Papers from the League of Canadian Poets' AGM on May 2015

Publishing TipsDuring the afternoon of May 30, 2015, as part of its annual general meeting in Winnipeg, the League of Canadian Poets hosted "Writing, Editing, and Publishing the Long Poem," a panel discussion on a genre that The Malahat Review has nurtured through the Long Poem Prize since 1988.

To coincide with the publication of The Malahat Review’s Summer 2015 issue, which showcases the two Long Poem Prize-winning poems by Gary Geddes and Genevieve Lehr, B.C. poets Kate Braid, Cornelia Hoogland, and Sharon Thesen have generously made the papers they delivered at the League's conference available on our website. Their remarks, which are an important addition to the critical literature, shed light on their experience at writing, and their attraction to and understanding of the challenges and history of the long poem in Canada and elsewhere.

Read more about the Long Poem Symposium papers.


Interviews

Interview with Andrew Wachtel, CNF Translator for the Malahat's upcoming Summer Issue

Andrew WachtelMalahat editor John Barton talks with Andrew Wachtel about the pleasures and challenges of translating contemporary Russian author Anzhelina Polonskaya's work into English, notably her creative nonfiction piece, "Greenland."

JB: How long have you been translating the work of Anzhelina Polonskaya? When did you first encounter her work and what drew you to it?

AW: I first encountered the work of Anzhelina Polonskaya in 1999. At that time, I was organizing a poetry festival at Northwestern University entitled “The Lands, Three Generations,” which brought poets from Poland, Russia, and Slovenia together with translators and critics. We asked Andrei Voznesensky for a recommendation of a poet of the youngest generation and he proposed Anzhelina. I translated her work for the conference booklet that we produced for the occasion. Subsequently, she asked me to produce more translations and we began to work closely together.

Read the full interview here.


Publishing Tips

Why All Writers Should Consider Writing Book Reviews

Publishing TipsThis month's Publishing Tip comes to you from Jessica Michalofsky, who argues for writing book reviews. It's not about the money anymore, nor is the old saying "Writers who can, write; writers who can't, criticize" relevant. Find out why!

Jessica Michalofsky's fiction, nonfiction, and reviews have been published in Geist, Joyland, Globe and Mail, The Winnipeg Review, Quarterly Conversation, Brick, The Rumpus, and Bookslut.

If you have a Publishing Tip you'd like to share, email us at malahat@uvic.ca, with "Publishing Tip Idea" in the subject line. Tips should be 750 words or less. If yours is accepted, you will be paid an honorarium of $50.

Read this month's Publishing Tip on writing book reviews.


Issues

Our Back Pages:
Issue #55, Summer 1980

Issue #55Issue 55 offers readers the opportunity to explore a contemporary creative landscape in which the translation of ideas, images, emotions and language merge to provide a wonderful international sampling of how modern literary and visual artists from Canada, Great Britain, the USA, Italy, Sweden, and the Czech Republic interpret their worlds. Read More

Following the success of our 50 Issues Project, in which we highlighted select back issues in honour of the University of Victoria’s 50th anniversary, we decided to cast our gaze back, chronologically, over our complete backlist…to include (eventually!) brief reviews of every issue not previously covered. Featured issues will be highlighted on our website biweekly.

Continue reading about this week's featured issue (write-up by Robin Reniero).


News

2015 Far Horizons Fiction Shortlist Announced

Long Poem PrizeWe're pleased to announce the shortlist for the 2015 Far Horizons Award for Fiction! Seven finalists have been chosen.

Thanks to all supporters and entrants for making this possible. The grand prize winner will be announced by July 16 online and through social media.

Far Horizons Award shortlist available here.


E-Newsletter

Malahat lite: July 2015 Edition

Jane SilcottLots of contest goodies in this e-newsletter!

Interviews: Jane Silcott, contest judge for the Constance Rooke Creative Nonfiction Prize, lets readers in on the importance of voice in nonfiction; Andrew Wachtel, translator of Issue 191 contributor Anzhelina Polonskaya's nonfiction piece, "Greenland," discusses what it's like to translate her work and the status of creative writing in current-day Russia.

Contests: The Constance Rooke Creative Nonfiction Contest is only a month away! Get those entries in and win $1000 plus publication.

More contests: announcing the shortlist for this year's Far Horizons Fiction Award.

Publishing Tip: past Malahat contributor Jessica Michalofsky offers advice to writers on book reviews, and why you should be writing them.

Discover all this and more in the July edition of Malahat lite.


Contests

Constance Rooke Creative Nonfiction Prize: Submissions in Full Swing

CNF Contest iconFive weeks remain to get your entry in for this year's CNF contest!

We want to hear your real-life stories adorned with narrative and dialogue. Be like past winners Anne Marie Todkill, Carla Funk, Liz Windhorst Harmer, and Rebecca Foust... and win $1000 alongside publication. We'll also interview you about your story and let the world know what a great writer you are.

Entries should be between 2000-3000 words and cost $35 in Canada, $40 in the U.S., and $45 elsewhere. Additional entries cost $15 each and there's no limit to how many you can send in. Each entrant will receive a one-year subscription or renewal extension to The Malahat Review.

Deadline is August 1. This year's contest judge is Jane Silcott.

Get full details on entering the 2015 Creative Nonfiction Contest.


Reviews

Issue 191, Summer 2015 Book Reviews Online

Invasive Species

Break into summer with the best of new Canadian lit!

The Malahat's summer issue will be mailed to subscribers in late July, but you can enjoy the book reviews section right here, right now. Get a taste for what's trending in CanLit and head to your local bookstore to support these authors.

Reviews of poetry collections by Michael Prior, Claire Kelly, Stevie Howell, Christopher Levenson, Claire Caldwell, and Kerry-Lee Powell (both Caldwell and Powell are past Far Horizons and Long Poem contest winners, respectively); reviews of fiction by Alexandra Leggat, Matt Rader, and Denise Roig; and reviews of nonfiction by rob mclennan and John Terpstra.

Read the reviews from Issue #191's table of contents page.


Issues

Our Back Pages:
Issue #54, Spring 1980

Issue #54Any writer knows that it can be discouraging to have one’s work met with relative silence—few or no reviews and poor sales. But one of the wonderful things about the written word is the ability to last through the ages, and it is that quality that should hearten us in our dark hours. Read More

Following the success of our 50 Issues Project, in which we highlighted select back issues in honour of the University of Victoria’s 50th anniversary, we decided to cast our gaze back, chronologically, over our complete backlist…to include (eventually!) brief reviews of every issue not previously covered. Featured issues will be highlighted on our website biweekly.

Continue reading about this week's featured issue (write-up by Jay Ruzesky).


Subscribe

Summer Promo Deal Until September 8: One-Year Subscriptions for $15

Summer Sub Icon

The Malahat Review is offering discounted one-year subscriptions over the summer!

Between now and September 8, you can purchase a subscription for just $15 from anywhere in the world. That's four issues for less than $5 each! Buy one for yourself or a friend, or extend your current subscription.

See the summer subscription page for details.


Opportunities

Employment at The Malahat Review This Fall

Job IconWant to work for one of Canada's most prestigious literary journals?

We're on the hunt for a Social Media, Marketing & Circulation Manager to work at our University of Victoria office. If you're tech savvy, love social media, and have a keen eye for detail, then we want to hear from you!

This is a permanent, part-time out-of-service (non-unionized) position, 25 hours/week at $16.75/hour, plus 4% vacation pay, no benefits. This job cannot be done remotely; you must live in the Greater Victoria area. Flexible job start date (training mid-August, begin early September).

Applications will be accepted until July 3, 4:30 p.m.

Click here for full job description and details on sending in your application.


Interviews

Interview with Christine Wiesenthal, Poetry Contributor to Issue 190, Spring 2015

Christine WiesenthalMalahat volunteer Melissa Stephens recently spoke with Christine Wiesenthal about the mythic and the scientific in her poems, "Staphylococcus" and "Salmonella," both recently published in Issue 190, Spring 2015 of the Malahat.

MS: You're both a creative and academic writer. Are these distinctive crafts for you? Does your creative publication history ever influence or shape the direction and venue for your academic publishing?

CW: Are they distinctive? Yes and no, I think! Yes, in the sense that critical/academic writing comes from a more conscious place of intention and deliberation—and usually more systematic research, in advance or alongside the writing. The experience or impulse that feeds creative writing is less predictable. What you think you want to write about, and how, and what you actually do end up writing, and how—they are most often very different things.

Read the full interview here.


Issues

Our Back Pages:
Issue #53, Fall 1979

Issue #53Editor Robin Skelton, in his prefatory Comment, bemoans the demise of the journal Canadian Literature in Translation, forced to shut down due to lack of support from The Canada Council. Skelton’s view is that the death of any magazine is to be mourned, but one that served to acquaint Canadians with international writing even more so. Read More

Following the success of our 50 Issues Project, in which we highlighted select back issues in honour of the University of Victoria’s 50th anniversary, we decided to cast our gaze back, chronologically, over our complete backlist…to include (eventually!) brief reviews of every issue not previously covered. Featured issues will be highlighted on our website biweekly.

Continue reading about this week's featured issue (write-up by Rhonda Batchelor).


E-Newsletter

Malahat lite: June 2015 Edition

Colin SnowsellThe first e-newsletter of the summer is here!

Interviews: Colin Snowsell talks sexual exploration and inherent violence in his Issue 190 fiction story, "Krankowsky"; Genevieve Lehr discusses the mythical and scientific in her Issue 190 poems, "Staphylococcus" and "Salmonella".

Job opportunities: we're hiring for our Social Media, Marketing & Circulation Manager position, with start date as late August. The applicant will be a tech-savvy individual who loves working with social media and is available to work from the Greater Victoria area, 25 hours a week.

Contests: The Constance Rooke Creative Nonfiction Contest is underway, and we're on the hunt for true stories adorned with narrative craft! Send us your life tales under 3000 words to win $1000 and publication in the Winter issue.

Discover all this and more in the June edition of Malahat lite.


Publishing Tips

Calling All Writers for Tips

Publishing TipsAs of May 2015, The Malahat Review will post "Publishing Tips" as a bimonthly guest column on its website and in the Malahat lite e-newsletter. Follow it in order to learn how to improve your professional skills, from the writing of cover letters, to what house style means, to choosing a rhyming dictionary, to having an author photo (as opposed to a selfie) shot.

If you have a Publishing Tip you'd like to share, email us at malahat@uvic.ca, with "Publishing Tip Idea" in the subject line. Tips should be 750 words or less. If yours is accepted, you will be paid an honorarium of $50.

Read the May 2015 entry, Paying to Submit to Literary Journals: Yay or Nay?


Interviews

Interview with Danny Jacobs, Poetry Contributor to Issue 190, Spring 2015

Danny JacobsMalahat volunteer L'Amour Lisik recently spoke with Danny Jacobs about industrial themes and linguistic edge in his two poems, "Fatberg" and "Refinery Plea" which appear in Issue 190, Spring 2015. His latest collection of poetry, Songs That Remind Us of Factories, was reviewed in Issue 186 and is available to read on the Reviews section of our site.

LL: What initially inspired you to write about something as gross as a fatberg? How much research went into your poems, “Fatberg” and “Refinery Plea”?

DJ: My wife works in plumbing; one day she e-mailed me an article about a particularly massive one of these things clogging London’s sewers—a lot of it slowly built up from flushed cooking oil and wet wipes. I had never heard of fatbergs before. Amazing! It was one of those too-good-not-to-write-a-poem moments. I mean, c’mon: the term alone demanded a poem. I had to at least try. And sure, they are gross, but I think they earn more than that. Imagine some Waste Management staffer faced with such a structure—he might go limp with a sense of the sublime.

Read the full interview here.


Issues

Our Back Pages:
Issue #52, Fall 1979

Issue #52Poetry figures prominently in this issue with works submitted by Reiko Tsukimura, Meena Alexander, Anne Szumigalski, Diana Keating, Naomi Rachel, and Donna Dunlop. The poets plumb the depths of their interpersonal experiences, at times bringing solitary observation into a public sphere and, conversely, re-imagining communal fables as something deeply personal. Read More

Following the success of our 50 Issues Project, in which we highlighted select back issues in honour of the University of Victoria’s 50th anniversary, we decided to cast our gaze back, chronologically, over our complete backlist…to include (eventually!) brief reviews of every issue not previously covered. Featured issues will be highlighted on our website biweekly.

Continue reading about this week's featured issue (write-up by stephen e. leckie).


News

Twitter Memoir Contest Grand Prize Winners

Twitter Memoir ContestCongratulations to Ross McKie and Amy Roher Antonini, the two grand prize winners of the Malahat's one-time Twitter Memoir Contest!

In collaboration with the Creative Nonfiction Collective Society and the Greater Victoria Public Library, the contest ran from January 9 to April 24 to celebrate our annual symposium, WordsThaw, as well as the CNFC's annual conference. Both events were held in Victoria this past spring.

Every two weeks, the best tweet was chosen that used the hashtag #140memoir. The grand prize winners' tweets were chosen from all bi-weekly winners, and were awarded book prizes donated generously by Canadian publishers.

See the special announcement page for the winning tweets.


Submit

Digital Fiction Submissions Now Accepted

SubmittableCalling all fiction writers! As of May 19, The Malahat Review is accepting digital fiction submissions via Submittable. Mailed-in / paper submissions of fiction (along with poetry and creative nonfiction) are no longer being read or processed by the Malahat office.

A Submittable account is free and it's easy to join. Unlike other literary journals, we don't charge writers to submit their work using Submittable.

Submissions of short fiction may be up to 8,000 words in length. Unless the stories are very short (i.e., less than 1000 words long each), no submission may consist of more than one story. Please note that you may only send in one piece of fiction to The Malahat Review per year.

Visit our submissions page for full details, and to access our Submittable site.


Contests

2015 Constance Rooke Creative Nonfiction Prize Now Accepting Submissions

CNF Contest iconIt's never too early to tell your life story, and we want to hear it!

Our annual Constance Rooke Creative Nonfiction Contest is OPEN and accepting entries. Childhood challenges, mid-life memoirs, octogenary oracles―send them by August 1 and you'll be in the running for $1,000, publication, and an online interview about your winning nonfiction piece. Note there is only one winner for this contest.

Entries should be between 2000-3000 words and cost $35 in Canada, $40 in the U.S., and $45 elsewhere. Additional entries cost $15 each and there's no limit to how many you can send in. Each entrant will receive a one-year subscription or renewal extension to The Malahat Review.

This year's contest judge is Jane Silcott.

Get full details on entering the 2015 Creative Nonfiction Contest.

Want inspiration? Read an interview with the 2014 winner, Rebecca Foust.


Issues

Our Back Pages:
Issue #51, Summer 1979

Issue #51In this issue, editor Robin Skelton authors a short essay that precedes eleven black-and-white images by the Spanish artist Mariano Villalta (1927-1984), who also contributes the untitled cover art. Skelton describes how Villalta's “paintings challenge with no definite images, but cause us to interpret them ourselves and consequently accuse ourselves.” That is to say, the poetry, fiction, and essays gathered here requisition our engagement as essential participants. Read More

Following the success of our 50 Issues Project, in which we highlighted select back issues in honour of the University of Victoria’s 50th anniversary, we decided to cast our gaze back, chronologically, over our complete backlist…to include (eventually!) brief reviews of every issue not previously covered. Featured issues will be highlighted on our website biweekly.

Continue reading about this week's featured issue (write-up by stephen e. leckie).


E-Newsletter

Malahat lite: May 2015 Edition

Genevieve LehrSpring is heating up and so is our e-newsletter!

In this issue, we bring you a NEW section called Publishing Tips which will highlight separate issues in the writing world, from cover letters to submission do's-and-don'ts to contest entries. First up, submission fees to literary journals: to pay or not to submit? (Send us your TIPS and we'll pay you $50 if it gets chosen!)

Interviews: Gary Geddes and Genevieve Lehr talk Long Poem Prize wins, and Danny Jacobs lets us in on his contribution of two poems to the upcoming Spring issue.

Contests: we congratulate our National Magazine Award nominees, and invite you to enter the annual Creative Nonfiction Contest (deadline August 1; Jane Silcott will judge final entries).

Discover the May edition of Malahat lite.


News

Two Malahat Authors Nominated for National Magazine Awards

NMA logoThis just in: two of our authors are finalists for the 38th annual National Magazine Awards!

Congratulations are in the works for Kelly Cooper and Douglas Burnet Smith. Cooper's creative nonfiction piece, "Ten Easy Steps" (which originally won our Open Season Awards for CNF back in 2014), is a finalist in the Personal Journalism Category. And three of Smith's poems, "Television," "Suppose there's a place we don't know of," and "Postcard" are all contenders in the Poetry category.

See the special announcement page here.


Contests

Far Horizons Fiction Award Deadline Extension

Far Horizons 2015Due to some issues with our online payment system that took place on May 1, we're extending the deadline for the Far Horizons Short Fiction Contest to Sunday, May 3 (midnight pacific standard time).

Please note this is only for entrants who plan to pay using our online payment method; postmark dates should still be May 1.

Get full details on entering the 2015 Far Horizons Award for Fiction.


Submit

Soon to Accept Fiction Submissions Online

SubmittableStarting mid-May 2015, we will be acccepting regular fiction submissions via Submittable. This will allow us to better streamline stories that come in and to avoid the hassle of paper. Mailed-in / paper submissions of fiction will no longer be accepted by our office once online stories are accepted.

A Submittable account is free and it's easy to join. Keep track of all your submission to literary journals and save on postage, paper, paperclips...

Visit our submissions page for details on Submittable.


Issues

Our Back Pages:
Issue #48, Fall 1978

Issue #47In this issue of The Malahat, the editors (Robin Skelton, Charles Lillard, and William David Thomas) juxtapose a highly diverse collection of poems, short stories, and essays to create a collage-like effect. Included here are works by poets from Canada (including Tom Wayman and Richard Outram), Great Britain, France, the United States, Russia, and Greece. Of particular note is the gathering of eight short poems by Kathleen Raine. Read More

Following the success of our 50 Issues Project, in which we highlighted select back issues in honour of the University of Victoria’s 50th anniversary, we decided to cast our gaze back, chronologically, over our complete backlist…to include (eventually!) brief reviews of every issue not previously covered. Featured issues will be highlighted on our website biweekly.

Continue reading about this week's featured issue (write-up by Robin Reniero).


News

Congratulations to Long Poem 2015 Winners: Gary Geddes and Genevieve Lehr

Gary GeddesThe Malahat Review is pleased to announce the winners of its 2015 Long Poem Prize!

Gary Geddes and Genevieve Lehr have won the Malahat's oldest poetry contest, and will each receive $1,000 and publication of their poems in the summer issue. Interviews will be posted in the May edition of Malahat lite, our monthly e-newsletter.

Thanks to contest judges Evan Jones, Anita Lahey, and Alice Major for their dedication to choosing the two winners. And a big thank you to all entrants!

Full Long Poem contest winners announcement page here.


Reviews

Issue 190, Spring 2015 Book Reviews Online

The Bricoleur and His Sentences

The Malahat Review invites its readers to leap into spring with brand new books... and what better way to choose than by reading recent book reviews?

Issue 190, Spring 2015 gets mailed out to subscribers at the end of April, but we've posted the book reviews early for you to sneak a peek at!

Reviews of poetry collections by Phyllis Webb, Dilys Leman, George Stanley; reviews of fiction by Kenneth Radu and Diane Schoemperlen; and reviews of nonfiction by Stan Dragland and Christine Lowther.

Read the reviews from Issue #190's table of contents page.


E-Newsletter

Malahat lite: April 2015 Edition

John ReibetanzApril's e-newsletter is chock full of literary contest updates and goodies!

Contest announcements: the Far Horizons Fiction contest deadline is approaching (May 1) - get your entries in to win $1000. And we announce the finalists for the 2015 Long Poem Prize on our website (two winners posted next week).

Interviews: Far Horizons Fiction contest judge Elyse Friedman discusses literary influences and what it takes to write well. And the 2015 Founders' Award winners John Reibetanz (pictured), Jan Zwicky, and K'ari Fisher talk about their winning pieces of poetry and fiction, respectively. See the announcement page here.

Discover the April edition of Malahat lite.


News

Take Our Survey on CanLit Submission Fees

Survey MonkeyDo you know that many literary magazines now charge for general submissions? Digital-submission managers like Submittable have changed how they manage what you send them to consider for publication.

Writer’s Relief defends the new practice: “Small admin fees can help struggling literary journals stay on their feet—and that’s good for writers. If a journal’s ability to stay viable is dependent upon charging a very small submission fee, then we at Writer’s Relief would support an ethical practice. We hope you will too.”

To launch “Publishing Tips,” a new monthly column starting in May on our website, The Malahat Review wants to know what you think. Have you ever paid to submit your work before? How much do you think would be fair? Complete our seven-question survey to have your say, then read about the survey results next month on our website and in Malahat lite.

Give us your opinion via Survey Monkey.


News

2015 Long Poem Prize Shortlist Announced

Long Poem PrizeWe're pleased to announce the shortlist for the 2015 Long Poem Prize! Six finalists have been posted to our website. Click here for the big reveal.

A record number of contest entries were received this year! Thanks to all supporters and entrants for making this possible. The grand prize winners (two) will be announced by April 17 online and through social media.

2015 Long Poem Prize contest shortlist here.

Read about the 2013 Long Poem Prize winners, Claire Caldwell and Kim Trainor.


Issues

Our Back Pages:
Issue #47, July 1978

Issue #47This themed issue of The Malahat Review showcases works by and in honour of Rafael Alberti (1902-1999), one of the most celebrated and respected literary figures in Spanish literature. “A Gathering in Honour of Rafael Alberti” brings together an impressive list of contributors to pay tribute to an artist who, in the words of guest editor William David Thomas, “is a man at the centre of Spanish cultural life.” Read More

Following the success of our 50 Issues Project, in which we highlighted select back issues in honour of the University of Victoria’s 50th anniversary, we decided to cast our gaze back, chronologically, over our complete backlist…to include (eventually!) brief reviews of every issue not previously covered. Featured issues will be highlighted on our website biweekly.

Continue reading about this week's featured issue (write-up by Robin Reniero).


Contests

Twitter Memoir Contest Still Open... Tweet Us!

Twitter Memoir ContestWordsThaw may be over, but entries are still being accepted for our Twitter Memoir Contest! Two dates remain for Round 6 (Friday, April 3) and Round 7 (Friday, April 20). Don't forget that we'll select a grand prize winner twice as the best entries.

Until April 24, 2015, The Malahat Review, the Creative Nonfiction Collective Society, and the Greater Victoria Public Library are joining forces to launch the Twitter Memoir Contest. Capture a fleeting moment in your life—comic or disturbing, bathetic or inspiring—in 140 characters or less, then tweet it to #140memoir. Note: that’s a zero in “140,” not a letter O.

The scribes of the best Twitter Memoirs will win books by emerging and established creative nonfiction writers from across Canada—all donated by the authors or their publishers.

Enter as often as you like (it's free!)—and retweet, favourite, mention, and of course, pour your heart out most succinctly! A pithy winner will be chosen every two weeks.

Click here for full details on the Twitter Memoir Contest.


Events

WordsThaw Literary Symposium Coming Up

WordsThawWordsThaw, the Malahat’s annual literary symposium, is back for 2015 with another dose of literary caffeine for writers and readers from March 20 - 22 at the University of Victoria. Featured events include readings, panel discussions, one-on-one blue pencil critiques, and a special poetry master class.

The panel discussion topics are as follows: Self-Publishing, Children’s Literature, Creative Nonfiction, and Minority Writing.

For a list of readers, event schedules, pricing, location, and to buy tickets, see the WordsThaw site. (Lots of local writers in attendance!)


Issues

Our Back Pages:
Issue #46, April 1978

Issue #46Issue forty-six answers previous issues’ cries for Canadian submissions with stories by George Bowering, W. P. Kinsella, and Gwendolyn MacEwen (1941 – 1987); and poems by Phyllis Webb and John V. Hicks (1907 – 1999). Read More

Following the success of our 50 Issues Project, in which we highlighted select back issues in honour of the University of Victoria’s 50th anniversary, we decided to cast our gaze back, chronologically, over our complete backlist…to include (eventually!) brief reviews of every issue not previously covered. Featured issues will be highlighted on our website biweekly.

Continue reading about this week's featured issue (write-up by Matthew Thibeault).


Interviews

Interview with Lynne Van Luven, Moderator for Creative Nonfiction Panel at WordsThaw 2015

Lynne Van LuvenMalahat volunteer Murray Leslie talks with Lynne Van Luven about her role as moderator for Natural Divide or Shape-Shifting Chic: Negotiating Creative Nonfiction's Extremes, one of four interactive panel discussions at this year's literary symposium, WordsThaw. Panelists include Fiona Tinwei Lam, Mark Leiren-Young, and Jane Silcott.

Murray: You grew up in a small town and cut your teeth (journalistically) at the Red Deer Advocate. Do you think that writing in a small western Canadian town gives you a unique perspective on human behaviour?

Lynne: I grew up on a farm, actually, and from Grade 7 on, went to school in a small town. When I got my first job at the Red Deer Advocate, I was totally green as a reporter and I had to learn everything on the job. It is nearly impossible to have that experience today because journalism had become professionalized. And because there are so few jobs left in print journalism. What I learned as a young reporter is that everyone has a story, and that no story is beneath the telling.

Read the full interview here.


Issues

Our Back Pages:
Issue #44, July 1977

Issue #44Editor Robin Skelton recognizes a neglect of Canadian content on the International literary scene and particularly laments the lack of Canadian literature courses offered in universities (he would surely be pleased to hear of UVic’s current Canadian Literature program including courses such as Modern Canadian Fiction, Modern Canadian Poetry, and Canadian Literature in Transnational Times). Despite the introductory cry for Canadian content, the issue opens with the beginning of an autobiography from British author, Anthony Burgess (1917-1993).  Fifteen years after the publication of A Clockwork Orange, on his sixtieth birthday, Burgess writes “You’ve Had Your Time,” a very self-conscious seven-page account of his personal history.

Following the success of our 50 Issues Project, in which we highlighted select back issues in honour of the University of Victoria’s 50th anniversary, we decided to cast our gaze back, chronologically, over our complete backlist…to include (eventually!) brief reviews of every issue not previously covered. Featured issues will be highlighted on our website biweekly.

Continue reading about this week's featured issue (write-up by Claire Macdonald).


E-Newsletter

Malahat lite: March 2015 Edition

Mike CarsonLeap into spring with this month's e-newsletter!

Contest announcements: The winners of the Founders' Awards for 2015 (poetry and fiction) have been announced. Congrats to K'ari Fisher, John Reibetanz, and Jan Zwicky on having their pieces selected!

Interviews: 2015 Open Season Award winners Rebecca Salazar, Wanda Hurren, and Mike Carson each talk with Malahat staff about their winning pieces, and the intricacies of writing. Lynne Van Luven, moderator at WordsThaw, talks about reality and creative nonfiction.

Discover the March edition of Malahat lite.


News

2015 Founders' Awards Winners Announced

Kari FisherThe Malahat Review is pleased to announce the winners of this year's Founders' Awards!

K'ari Fisher has won the Jack Hodgins Founders' Award for Fiction with her story, "Mercy Beatrice Wrestles the Noose," originally published in Issue 186.

John Reibetanz and Jan Zwicky have both won the P. K. Page Founders' Award for Poetry with their poems, "Fresco Magic" (Issue 186) and "Into the Gap" (Issue 187), respectively.

Founders' Awards are given to the best pieces to appear in the Malahat in the previous year. Winners also receive $1,000! Interviews will appear in April's e-newsletter.

See the announcement pages for author bios and judge citations.


Read more stories from the Malahat news archive.

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